Employers: Does your Job Description Suck?

Posted by & filed under Wilmington Business Journal Articles.

BY COREY LEWIS – FOUNDER, OWNER AND PRESIDENT, CAPE FEAR JOBS

 

Not getting the response you want from your job posting?

The issue may very well be your job description… or lack thereof. Let me ask you this question – what is your reaction when you get a sloppy application or poorly written resume for your job opening? It’s a winning bet that a job seeker has the same reaction when clicking on a posting, only to find a poorly written job description – minimal details, no day-to-day duties, nothing but vague description and, frankly, junk that leaves the applicant guessing what it is you really want.

Often what happens is you, the employer, get frustrated with job seekers in the market and may start to think there are simply no quality applicants… or you may have no applicants at all. Or perhaps you get frustrated with the website on which you posted the position and think it’s the site that is ineffective. The reality is that your description of what you want to hire for is ineffective.

Do you know the seven steps to an effective job description? Do you know what it takes to draw in the talent you are seeking?

Let’s keep this simple. In my next article, I will discuss for job seekers the key parts to a great resume.

But for now, let’s start with the key aspects of a great job description.

 

Use an Eye-Catching and Accurate Ad Title

Grab the attention of job seekers right away and make them want to open your advertisement. Let candidates know whether you are looking for someone to fill a full-time or part-time position. If it is for an internship position, let the candidates know if it is paid, as well as the duration of the internship. It is also essential to list the location of the role to ensure you are targeting the correct candidates, as there is no use in people applying if they are out of the area (or across town) and uninterested in relocating or commuting.

 

Start By Introducing Your Company

An upbeat description of your company goes a long way even if it is only a couple of sentences. Tell them about the culture and what it’s like working there.

 

Give a Position Overview

Include a short synopsis of your position that delivers a concise description of the position, its purpose and general responsibilities. Choose a writing style that matches the company culture and nature of the role. If you are hiring for a startup with a very casual culture, for example, be sure to use words that evoke that feeling.

 

Be Clear About the Skills and Qualifications

Using bullet points, explain what someone in the position will do. Paint a picture for the job seeker of what a day in the life is like for this role. Specify all the mandatory qualifications and experience, along with any preferred skills. For each qualification, include the required level of experience, licenses and certifications, as well as any necessary technical proficiency.

 

List Position Requirements

Detail in bullet points what is required for the position. Special skills, computer skills, education, any licenses required, any dress code or physical requirements can also be listed. You should also include the traits or attributes you expect the candidate to display in the role – for example, behavioral competencies, such as leadership, teamwork, flexibility, initiative and communication.

 

Tell Candidates How To Apply

We cannot stress enough that you should make this as simple as possible. Job seekers on Cape Fear Jobs have both a complete job application, in addition to uploaded resumes. Make your life easy and accept application/resumes from us and stop with the “follow this link, follow that link, fill this out, fill that out” routine. It’s turning away great employees. Trust us. Plus, we can track it for you.

 

We promised seven steps to an effective job description, but we want to save the details of number seven for a separate article at a different time. But that last step is pay scale competitiveness, and I think that subject is self-explanatory.

Let me just say this, and clients of Cape Fear Jobs will attest, don’t scrimp. Pay your people and they will stay and make your life a lot easier. Nit-pick salaries and, well, you already know what happens.

 

 

Corey Lewis has more than 20 years of management, business development and project management experience across the retail, construction and staffing verticals. Entering into the recruiting industry in 2007 as an Executive Recruiter, Lewis spent the next seven years honing his recruiting skills and leading a local agency in developing the manufacturing sector of the company. With the support of his wife, Corey started his own boutique firm, Alliance Career Group based in Wilmington, while designing the basis for the company that would come to be known as Cape Fear Jobs. Corey found his passion for helping a struggling jobs economy in the Cape Fear Region and in 2016, Cape Fear Jobs was born. Visit the Cape Fear Jobs website or call (910) 782-2142.

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